Stretford Mall irony

Always Open

Wall of sound

For many years, the late tosser Fitz and I would retire to his house after our weekly Tuesday-night pub session to drink loads of coffee and listen to music. Fitz was a big folk music fan, so he would invariably end up playing some Blowzabella. Blowzabella was a British folk band that specialised in playing droney instruments: violins, bagpipes, hurdy-gurdies, that sort of thing. They were pretty magnificent.

I write in the past tense, because I always assumed Blowzabella stopped making music years ago. Imagine my surprise and delight earlier this week, therefore, when I learnt they're still going strong, and churning out magnificent rackets like this:

You can thank me later.

Compare and Contrast

Musk

Tesla's Elon Musk (sic).

Harkness

Torchwood's Capt. Jack Harkness.

We have a right to know.

Re. the ‘newspaper’ that delivered Brexit

Guardian: Wikipedia bans Daily Mail as 'unreliable' source
Wikipedia editors have voted to ban the Daily Mail as a source for the website in all but exceptional circumstances after deeming the news group “generally unreliable”… The editors described the arguments for a ban as “centred on the Daily Mail’s reputation for poor fact checking, sensationalism and flat-out fabrication”.

(My emphasis added.)

BBC science fail

BBC: Spectacular snow moon regales worldFebruary's full moon also coincides with a partial lunar eclipse.

*sigh*

There is nothing ‘coincidental’ about a lunar eclipse occurring during a full moon: every lunar eclipse that ever happened occurred during a full moon.

For a lunar eclipse to occur, the sun and moon must be on opposite sides of the earth. The same configuration is required for a full moon. The only difference is that, during a lunar eclipse, the sun, earth, and moon happen to line up exactly, causing the earth's shadow from the sun to be cast on the moon.

Busy man

Spotted in the gents' loo at the Birch Service Station on the M62 this morning: a businessman operating two hand-driers simultaneously, one for each hand.

Now there's a man with not enough time (and too much water) on his hands, I thought. I wouldn't mind betting he'd read some self-help book on personal productivity: 200 Killer Hacks to Save Yourself an Hour a Day, or some such nonsense.

To complicate matters, the middle of the three hand-driers wasn't working, so the man had to extend his arms to full-stretch to accomplish his astonishing time-saving feat. He looked for all the world like Jesus hanging on the cross—albeit Jesus in a snazzy business suit. I would have liked to grab a photo, but realised taking pictures of men in gents' loos was the sort of thing likely to get me arrested.

Still, though, what a thoroughly efficient man! There was a chap who understood the true value of his time: so much more precious than that of the fat, bearded bloke standing behind him with dripping hands.

Shock news

BBC: Local voting figures shed new light on EU referendum

[…] local results were strongly associated with the educational attainment of voters - populations with lower qualifications were significantly more likely to vote Leave. […] The level of education had a higher correlation with the voting pattern than any other major demographic measure from the census.

Call me a Liberal Elitist, but it seems to me that maybe we should be treating education as a higher priority. Then maybe, just maybe, in the long-run, the British public might stop making such monumentally stupid decisions.